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Urban Exergames – how architects and serious gaming researchers collaborate on digital games that make you move [accepted for publication]

Key:KDHG14
Author:Martin Knöll, Tim Dutz, Sandro Hardy, Stefan Göbel
Date:January 2014
Kind:In collection - use for chapters in edited books
Publisher:Springer
Address:Berlin
Book title:Virtual and Augmented Reality in Healthcare 1
Chapter:11
Editor:Minhua Ma, Lakhmi Jain, Anthony Whitehead, Paul Anderson
Pages:191-207
Volume:68
ISBN:978-3-642-54816-1
Abstract:This chapter presents a novel research collaboration between architects and computer scientists to investigate and develop mobile, context-­sensitive serious games for sports and health (so-­called exergames). Specifically, it describes a new approach that aims to design exergames which interact with the player’s built, topographic, and social environment in a meaningful way and presents strategies on how to integrate research on health­‐oriented urban design and planning to the design of such games. To that end, this chapter analyzes the state of the art of mobile context-­‐sensitive exergames and introduces the reader to the basics of “Active Street Design”. After recapitulating how the built environment influences physical activity such as walking, cycling, and stair climbing in everyday situations it is speculated on how to integrate best practices and guidelines from architecture into the game design process in order to create attractive and more effective exergames. The chapter is concluded with a discussion on strategies to validate the (positive) side­‐effects of urban exergames and an outline of future research directions.
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